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Tag: Dropouts

Over 500,000 Learners Drop Out of School

Over 500,000 children have dropped out of school during the coronavirus pandemic, data from the latest National Income Dynamics Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (NIDS-CRAM) shows. The NIDS-CRAM is a study conducted by a national consortium of 30 social science researchers from South African universities, as well as groups like the Human Sciences Research Council, and the Department of Education.

The survey is a comprehensive and nationally representative survey of exactly how the Covid-19 pandemic and consequent lockdown impacted South African households, with a particular focus on income and employment.  The group’s researchers discovered that school dropouts have tripled from 230,000 pre-pandemic to approximately 750,000 in May 2021.

90% of respondents indicated that all learners in the household had returned to school, with 10% of respondents indicating that at least one learner in their household had not yet returned to school since the beginning of the year.

Importantly, almost all households (99%) had some children attending, indicating that parents seem to be sending some children back but not all children in their household, the researchers said.

The General Household Survey of 2018 found that approximately 230,000 learners aged between 7and 17 years old, were not attending school in 2018. This is considered to be the “pre-pandemic” or “normal” rate of dropout.

Using the NIDS-CRAM Wave 5 data it is estimated that in May 2021 the total number of 7-17-year-olds that had dropped out of school (meaning they have not attended school once during 2021) was between 650,342 and 753,371 depending on assumptions. This marks a threefold increase in school dropouts, an alarming statistic.

“Whether this is temporary or permanent dropout is, as yet, unknown, although previous research shows that the longer children remain out of school the higher the likelihood of permanent dropout,” the researchers said.

“Learner dropout rates are now at the highest rates they have been in 20 years, i.e. since it started being monitored in household surveys in 2002. Reciprocally, school attendance is at the lowest level it has been in 20 years, Average school attendance rates have dropped from a high of 98% in 2018, to 94% in April/May 2021.”

 

Loss of Teaching Time

Projections indicate that between March 2020 and June 2021, most primary school learners in South Africa have lost 70%-100% (i.e. an entire year) of learning relative to the 2019 cohort. In total, 93 days of schooling have occurred between 15 February 2021 and 30 June 2021, according to the researchers.

Assuming contact learning for 50% of this time, best estimates suggest that the majority of primary school children have lost between 70% to a full year of learning since March 2020.

“To put this in perspective, this is the same as saying that the average Grade 3 child in June 2021 would have the same learning outcomes as the average Grade 2 child in June 2019.

“However, the international evidence points towards additional effects of ‘forgetting’ or regression that could hinder current learning, particularly if teaching occurs as if the content of the previous year’s curriculum has been mastered, let alone learnt.”

Therefore, cumulative learning losses could exceed a full year of learning as learners move through the school system, the researchers said.

 

Vaccines

 

The Department of Education has embarked on a massive vaccine drive, that ended on Thursday, to innoculate as many teachers and educational staff as possible before the projected reopening of schools later in July. Officials don’t want learners to lose more teaching time but said they will be guided by the National Coronavirus Command Council and president Cyril Ramaphosa on the matter. Decisions on whether the current level 4 lockdown will be extended or not will be made this weekend and announcements are expected to be made sooner rather than later.

SA’s vaccine rollout has steadily picked up speed. Although vaccine supply was initially the major constraint to the rollout of vaccines in South Africa this is no longer the case. At the end of June 2021, South Africa had 7.4 million doses of vaccines but only three million doses had been administered.

The majority of South African adults, 71%,  say they would get vaccinated if a Covid-19 vaccine was available. In the latest wave of NIDS-CRAM all respondents were asked “If a vaccine for Covid-19 were available, I would get it”.

Among the respondents who were vaccine-hesitant, the three leading reasons for their hesitancy were that they were worried about the side effects (31%), did not believe it was effective (21%), or did not trust vaccines in general (18%).

300,000 School Dropouts due to COVID

It is estimated that nearly 300,000 pupils may have dropped out of primary schools across SA over a six-month period during the lockdown.  Minister of Basic Education Angie Motshekga confirmed this in response to questions in the National Assembly by DA MP Nomsa Tarabella-Marchesi.

KwaZulu-Natal had the highest number of dropouts at 126,553, followed by the Western Cape with 114,588, Gauteng with 55,571, the Northern Cape with 10,290 and Eastern Cape with 8,153.  It’s believed that 5,482 pupils may have dropped out in the Free State and 4,390 in Mpumalanga. The least affected provinces were Limpopo with 800 and North West with only 370.

Minister Motshekga said there were several methods used to encourage parents to return their children to schools.  “Parents are contacted through WhatsApp groups. On the third day of non-attendance,  letters are written to parents. Teachers also make house visits. Non-attendance by learners is discussed at district command council meetings and circuit management centres are encouraged to communicate with municipalities,” she said.

“[We] encourage parents to send absent learners to school. Through telephone calls, SMSs, local radio stations and home visits, dates for returning of respective grades are timeously communicated to parents and learners. A demerit system is used on learners who are absent without valid reasons.”

The department, in conjunction with the health department, on November 4 agreed to allow pupils who tested positive for Covid-19 to write the combined 2020 November examinations under specific conditions and safety protocols.

“The important part is that parents/guardians of candidates who have tested positive for Covid-19 are obliged to inform the school principal immediately of the positive status of the candidate. This is to ensure that arrangements can be made for the candidate to write the examination at an isolation venue that complies with the health, safety and also regulations relating to a secure examination,” said the minister.

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